Careerbytes

Nearly one-third of workers lose interest in job offer if employer won't negotiate beyond salary

November 27, 2019

Hiring in-demand job candidates often requires sweetening the pot with nonmonetary perks, and new research from global staffing firm Robert Half confirms it. Thirty-two percent of workers surveyed in Canada admitted they’ve lost interest in a position when the company wasn’t willing to negotiate elements beyond salary. Robert Half also surveyed finance executives on the topic, and nearly all (99%) said their companies are open to some back-and-forth with candidates on job offers: 62% are willing to talk about compensation, and many are also prepared to discuss benefits (48%), professional development and training reimbursement (44%) and remote work or scheduling arrangements (43%). One-third of workers (34%) have never negotiated salary as part of a job offer.

Survey reveals persistent stereotypes and unconscious gender bias stand in the way of female leadership in Canada

November 25, 2019

Randstad Canada recently surveyed 2,000 adult workers (an equal proportion of women and men) to understand why there aren't more women in leadership roles in Canada. The survey, commissioned as part of Randstad's Women Transforming the Workplace initiative, reveals the extent to which unconscious gender bias and stereotypes hamper female advancement and leadership. Overall, the survey showed a majority of working Canadian women and men (71%) believe balanced representation of both genders on a leadership team will have a positive impact on a business' financial success. However, this is offset by a much lower proportion of men (65%) than women (77%) who acknowledge the potential gender-balanced leadership teams hold.

When asked why there aren't more women in leadership roles, the majority of women (62%) identify gender discrimination as a factor, while only 41 per cent of men held the same view. Addressing this discrepancy will be crucial to creating meaningful change and shifting the perception held by more than a quarter of male respondents (27%) that the reason there aren't more women in leadership is because of a lack of qualified and skilled candidates. Half of Canadian women (50%) said prioritizing family life keeps women from leadership roles, compared to 42% of men who stated this to be true of women. Similarly, 26% of women responded that "women don't take enough risks to advance their career" whereas only 19% of men shared this view. Surprisingly, to account for the lack of women in these roles, nearly one third (32%) of Canadian workers believe the lack of executive female role models is the leading explanation for why we don't see more women in C-suite roles, with nearly as many saying there is a lack of training and support (25%) for women.

New survey results show that more than half of nonprofits provide diversity training

November 19, 2019

The new Nonprofit Diversity Practices survey saw 51% of respondents indicate that their nonprofits have provided general diversity training between 2018 and 2019. More than 560 individuals from the United States and Canada responded to the survey. Training on “implicit/unconscious bias” was the second most common (40%) type of diversity training identified by survey takers. There is a near even occurrence of training for nonprofit leadership and staff (excluding the board). 41% of respondents report that their organizations have provided diversity training to leadership and 43% that their nonprofits have provided diversity training to staff. North American-based nonprofit diversity data and other metrics of greater depth are included in a comprehensive report.

PwC Canada makes significant investment in upskilling, including for nonprofit organizations

November 19, 2019

It’s become increasingly apparent that one of Canada’s most pressing challenges is the growing mismatch between the skills people have and those needed for the digital world. That’s why PwC Canada is committing $150 million over the next three years to upskill its 7,850 people to be future ready and to share their knowledge to support clients and communities. According to PwC Canada’s CEO Survey, only 16% of Canadian CEOs focus on upskilling compared to 46% globally. In addition to upskilling its own people, PwC is also committed to providing training to 1 million people and NPOs across Canada to help them maximize their potential.

Survey shows almost half of workers would move to a 4-day work week if possible

November 19, 2019

Wanting to understand the global “working week” better, Citrix recently surveyed 3,750 office and home workers across the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Canada, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, investigating the hours they work currently and the likelihood of them adopting a four-day working week in the future. Above all, the research revealed overwhelming support for the four-day week, with 87% of respondents saying they would take the option if their employer offered it to them, and 41% agreeing a four-day working week would be feasible with their current workload. Overall, 53% of our survey respondents are contracted to work regular set hours (i.e. the traditional 9-to-5). Only 4% overall have complete flexibility in the way they work, with no set number of working hours.

Additionally, overtime is rife, and 86% of the office workers surveyed admitted it is commonplace for them to work outside of their preferred working hours. Of these, 47% are putting in these additional hours “daily” or “most days”, and one can safely assume this is an upwards trend. Half (51%) of survey respondents also feel their country is facing an overtime epidemic. When it comes to the amount of time spent working outside of preferred hours, the average is four hours 36 minutes per week, with 21% working an additional eight hours or more, equivalent to an extra day. It therefore comes as little surprise that 52% say their week feels closer to a six-day week than a four-day week.

Women and racialized minority representation in Montreal's senior leadership on the rise

November 13, 2019

A new study shows that the representation of women and racialized minorities in senior leadership positions in the Greater Montreal Area (GMA) has increased since 2016 but both are still under-represented based on their proportion in the population. Ryerson University's Diversity Institute and Canada Women's Foundation looked at 2,537 senior leaders across the largest organizations in the public, corporate, voluntary, education and health sectors of the GMA and found that in 2019, women, who make up over 50% of the population of the GMA, held 40.7% of senior leadership positions, up 8.1% from 2016.

The study also found that racialized people, who make up over 22% of the population of the GMA, held only 5.3% of the senior leadership positions. This increased by 12.5% since 2016. Government agencies, boards and commissions were found to have the greatest amount of diversity while the corporate sector was found to have the least amount of diversity, which presents a challenge as Bill C-25, which requires all federally incorporated businesses to report on the diversity of their senior management to their shareholders and to the federal government, comes into effect on January 1st, 2020.

Community investment gives corporations a decisive edge in the talent war: survey

November 13, 2019

The 2019 Corporate Community Investment Report from Imagine Canada, entitled Profit, Purpose and Talent: Trends and Motivations in Corporate Giving and Volunteering, shows conclusively that high levels of community engagement lead to long-term business advantages. The research underpinning the report included the opinions of 1,506 private sector employees and a survey of 65 leading Canadian corporations in community investment. Collectively, these corporations invested $592 million in communities over the past year. Key findings include:

  • 50% of employees surveyed say they considered their employer’s reputation for charitable and community work before accepting their position
  • 28% say they would be willing to take a pay decrease to work for a more socially responsible company

Among employees who believe their company is highly committed to community:

  • 84% are extremely or very satisfied with their job compared to 46 per cent among others
  • 59% say they are very likely to recommend their company versus 23 per cent among others
  • 47% strongly agree they share a common social purpose with their company compared to 16 per cent among other

The study also reveals high potential for growing employee giving. Among those working for companies with payroll deduction programs, employee donation matching and giving campaigns, 79% reported they donated to charity versus 47% among those with no workplace donation programs. As well, 76% of those surveyed say they now regularly support a charity they learned about at work.

BCG's Centre for Canada's Future releases new insights on diversity & inclusion in corporate Canada

November 13, 2019

BCG's Centre for Canada's Future launched a new report on diversity and inclusion (D&I) that examines the workplace experience of diverse employees in Canada. Beyond Good Intentions: Bringing an Employee Lens to Diversity & Inclusion in Corporate Canada, based on a survey of more than 5,000 employees, found that significant numbers of diverse employees still experience barriers to advancement and workplace bias. The survey revealed that one-third of women, LGBTQ2, people of colour, indigenous and disabled employees say they face persistent obstacles to recruitment, retention, and advancement. In addition, individuals from majority groups often fail to perceive the obstacles that diverse employees face. Overall, half of employees who identify with one or more diversity groups say that workplace bias remains a day-to-day reality. According to the survey, nearly half of diverse respondents say they see inconsistent commitment down through the managerial ranks. In addition, less than half of diverse employees say they have "allies" at work, individuals who actively support the inclusion and advancement of colleagues from diverse backgrounds.

More than one-third of workers in Canada say their commute is stressful

November 5, 2019

In a new survey from global staffing firm Robert Half, more than one-third of professionals (35%) said travelling to and from work is stressful. In addition, 36% of respondents lamented that their trip to the office is too long, up from 28% in a similar 2017 survey. Professionals said they spend an average of 53 minutes commuting each day, and more than one-quarter (26%) stated their travel time exceeds one hour. In a separate survey, senior managers said their company offers flexible scheduling to avoid peak traffic times (37%) and telecommuting (30%) to help alleviate employees' stressful trips.

Deloitte research reveals significant return on investment for workplace mental health programs

November 4, 2019

First-of-its-kind Canadian research has found that positive returns on investment (ROI) of workplace mental health initiatives are within reach for Canadian businesses, according to a report released today by Deloitte Canada. Analysis reveals that companies with mental health programs in place for one year had a median annual ROI of $1.62 for every dollar invested. For companies with programs in place for three or more years, the median annual ROI is more than double—valued at $2.18 for every dollar spent. The report, The ROI in workplace mental health programs: Good for people, good for business, explores historical investment and savings data from seven large Canadian companies at various stages of rolling out mental health programs and supports. Key findings from the report include:

  • Wellness programs are more likely to achieve positive ROI when they support employees along the entire spectrum of mental health—from promotion of well-being to intervention and care.
  • Employers could achieve greater program ROI by prioritizing investing in higher-impact areas such as leadership training and preventive interventions, including psychological care benefits.
  • If employers measure their baseline data and take stock of existing initiatives, many organizations would realize they have already started to use the right tools to strengthen workplace mental health.
  • Putting in place mechanisms to measure performance can enable organizations to achieve desired program impact, improve adoption rates, and enhance decision-making.

Donor control, conflict of interest and tainted money key ethical concerns for fundraisers

October 29, 2019

With the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) celebrating October as Ethics Awareness Month, the association conducted an online survey of its members earlier in the year to assess members’ awareness of AFP ethical resources, potential changes to its Code of Ethical Principles and which ethical issues were of most concern to members. The survey results show that long-standing issues such as donor control of gifts, conflict of interest and “tainted” money remain top ethical concerns for many fundraisers, but workplace issues, including sexual harassment and working with top executive staff, are important as well.

According to the survey, most members don’t have to address challenging ethical situations or dilemmas very often. Almost 50% of respondents said they typically face challenges or dilemmas once a year, while 23% reported they have never had to address such a situation, whereas close to 17% said roughly six times per year, and eight percent encountered challenges once a month. The survey did not specifically define what a “challenge” or “dilemma” was, so respondents may have different views of the situations they face.

From a list of common ethical challenges, respondents also identified ethical issues on which they need more guidance and resources. Donor control and restrictions on how gifts can be used was identified by almost half (48%) of respondents as a critical issue, followed by conflicts of interest (41%) and “tainted” money from donors (40%).

However, throughout the survey, several issues kept arising that members were interested in seeing AFP address through its Code of Ethics or through other means. These included sexual harassment, racial and gender bias, working with elderly donors, and online crowdfunding platforms.

Nearly 9 In 10 employees in Canada come to work sick, survey shows

October 24, 2019

In new research from global staffing firm Accountemps, 89% of professionals in Canada admitted they've at least sometimes come to the office with cold or flu symptoms. Of those respondents, 27% always go to work even when they're under the weather. More than half of those who report to the office with the cold or flu (54%) do so because they have too much work to do; another 33% don't want to use a sick day.

Majority of managers in Canada say their staff are experiencing some degree of burnout

October 22, 2019

A recent survey from staffing firm Accountemps found that nearly all senior managers in Canada (96%) believe their team members are experiencing some degree of burnout. In a separate survey, 95% of Canadian workers said they are at least somewhat burned out. Senior managers were asked to report the level of burnout among employees on a scale of 1 (not at all burned out) to 10 (completely burned out), and the average was 5.7. One in five respondents rated their team’s burnout level 8 or higher. Workers cited an average burnout level of 5.6, with 22% of respondents falling within the 8 to 10 range. Workers and managers alike seem to agree burnout is an issue, but they don’t see eye to eye on the main reason. When given a list of factors that may be contributing to employee burnout, workers ranked constant interruptions and putting out fires first, while senior managers believed unmanageable workloads were the biggest issue for their teams.

Half of fundraisers likely to leave current position within two years

October 22, 2019

More than 80% of fundraisers are satisfied with many key aspects of their current job, yet half are likely to leave their position by 2021, according to a new survey by the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and The Chronicle of Philanthropy conducted independently online by the Harris Poll. The survey, which queried more than 1,000 fundraisers across the U.S. and Canada including members of AFP, asked questions related to job satisfaction, fundraising support in the workplace, organizational culture, professional development and salaries and benefits.

The survey reveals a significant amount of tension and pressure in most fundraising jobs. Eighty-four percent feel tremendous pressure to succeed in their role, and more than half (55%) feel or have felt under-appreciated in their role. This pressure is one factor in leading to 51% of respondents indicating they are very or somewhat likely to leave their current job over the next two years. In addition, 30% of fundraisers reported they are likely to leave the fundraising profession altogether by 2021. The 2019 Report found that two-thirds of respondents looked for a promotion within their organization in 2018, while 26% sought opportunities at other charities or nonprofits. Salary, along with organizational, management, and leadership issues, are the most common reasons given for being likely to leave the profession, followed by workload.

One-third of workers OK with discussing politics at work: survey

October 18, 2019

According to an article published by Canadian HR Reporter, almost one-third (31%) of Canadian workers feel discussing politics at work is appropriate, though the majority (57%) think it depends on the situation and people involved. But younger workers are more comfortable with the topic than older ones: 55% of workers ages 18 to 24 think political conversations at work are appropriate, compared to 35% of those ages 25 to 40 and 27% of those 41 to 54 and 55 and older.

Survey finds Canadian workers are scrutinizing salaries

October 18, 2019

Canadian employees are putting in more work when it comes to knowing their worth, according to new research from global staffing firm Robert Half. The studies revealed that 75% of professionals feel well-informed about what they should be making in their current position, and 56% say they’ve checked their salary against market rates through online resources, salary guides or job postings in the last year ? up from 52% in a similar survey two years ago. The majority of workers, 53%, also admit to comparing notes on compensation with coworkers. While their level of salary research may be rising, many workers aren’t liking what they’re finding, the survey suggests. Only 49% feel they are adequately paid.

Two in five workers in Canada have quit due to a bad boss

October 8, 2019

New research from global staffing firm Robert Half suggests there's some truth to the saying, "people leave managers, not companies." About two in five professionals surveyed in Canada (39%) have quit a job due to a bad boss. "Managers set the tone for the office and have a considerable amount of influence over the daily experiences and satisfaction of their employees for better or worse," said David King, senior district director for Robert Half. "When supervisors show genuine enthusiasm for projects or new initiatives, and encourage open and frequent communication in the workplace, staff feel more engaged, and better supported in day-to-day challenges."

Introducing the new Workplace Strategies for Mental Health

October 2, 2019

The new Workplace Strategies for Mental Health name and look was unveiled at the Better Workplace Conference in Whistler, BC, hosted by the Conference Board of Canada. Formerly known as the Great-West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace, the organization will be called Workplace Strategies for Mental Health, compliments of Canada Life, effective immediately. The refreshed brand identity will be rolled out to existing online and social media platforms. It will also be incorporated into new communication materials and tools as they are developed. The next part of the organization's journey includes offering a simplified website experience, slated to launch in fall 2020.

Survey reveals growing disconnect between level of cyber security training in the workplace

October 2, 2019

Scalar Decisions announced an inaugural survey exploring how aware and prepared Canadian employees feel when facing the unique cyber security and cloud security challenges of the digital era. The Digital Citizen: A Canada-Wide Survey on Security Awareness in the Workplace revealed a growing disconnect between how prepared Canadian employees feel to deal with cyber security threats and how much training they receive. While 75% of Canadians feel they are prepared to handle cyber security attacks in the workplace, the majority of Canadians (60%) say they have not received any form of cyber security training.

Of concern and revealed in The Digital Citizen, seven percent of respondents indicated their organizations do not take any measures at all to prevent attacks. A large percentage of Canadians also remain unsure about cloud security, what it means, and whether they've received any training regarding cloud security. Following these new findings, it is clear that Canadian organizations are presented with an opportunity to better fut­ure proof employees. In fact, one quarter (24%) of those surveyed revealed they have been the target of an attack at work, and a further third (31%) of respondents have been targeted at home. Employees in Alberta (36%) expressed the highest rates of at-home threats, while those in Quebec (26%) were the least likely.

Morneau Shepell survey shows salaries expected to increase by 2.7 per cent in 2020

October 2, 2019

Employers in Canada are expecting base salaries to rise by an average of 2.7% in 2020, according to Morneau Shepell's 2020 Salary Projection Survey. This is an increase from the actual 2.6% average increase in 2019. The forecast includes increases in salary structure, length of service, cost of living and merit pay, and excludes salary freezes and promotional adjustments. The expected 2.7% increase is higher than the projected rate of inflation for the year. In July, the Bank of Canada noted that consumer price index inflation is expected to rise to about 2.0% by the end of 2020. When looking at economic growth, according to the Bank of Canada, the Canadian economy is projected to grow by just 1.4% in 2019.

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