Newsbytes

AFP releases new Fundraising is Awesome document

March 11, 2019

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) has relesaed a new Fundraising is Awesome document that can be used for a variety of purposes: recruitment, board education, and team building, to name just a few. It’s also a great primer for both experienced and aspiring fundraisers to understand the impact that the profession has. Fundraising is Awesome also serves as a recruitment tool, both for the profession and for the AFP community. There are many facts that have been curated into the document—including sections on the impact of the profession and the charitable sector, why you should become a fundraiser and traits of a successful practitioner—to compel more people to choose an amazing and inspirational career.

Apply now for the TalentEgg National Campus Recruitment Excellence Awards and Conference

March 11, 2019

For the first time ever, TalentEgg is proud to have expanded the Award categories for this year's TalentEgg National Campus Recruitment Excellence Awards and Conference to recognize and celebrate the charities, nonprofit organizations and individuals who go above and beyond in recruiting top young talent! The new award categories are as follows:

Campus Recruiting Program of the Year for a Nonprofit. This award recognizes the charity or nonprofit organization that has executed the best campus recruitment program of the year. Judges will be asked to consider the activities undertaken by the organization and the success achieved.

Campus Recruiter of the Year for a Nonprofit (Individual). This award is for exceptional individual nonprofit campus recruiters who have particularly egg-celled over the past year. Judges will be asked to provide feedback on the individual's overall achievements in the campus recruitment market. Applications for this award may be submitted personally or by a third-party nomination.

Applications for the 2019 Awards close on March 29, 2019. Finalists will be notified in the Spring of 2019, and the Awards Ceremony and the official announcement of winners will take place on June 19, 2019 at The TalentEgg National Campus Recruitment Excellence Awards and Conference at the Globe and Mail Centre. Each award category is comprised of a short questionnaire and offers the opportunity to supply supporting material in PDF format. Plus, there is no cost to apply!

Government of Canada invites proposals for projects to help newcomers enter the job market faster

March 7, 2019

Today, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, launched a Call for Concepts under the Foreign Credential Recognition (FCR) Program. The total funding for this Call for Concepts is up to $10 million, which will fund approximately 15 projects to help newcomers find work. The Government is seeking innovative and collaborative concepts from stakeholders that address specific barriers to the integration of highly skilled newcomers into the Canadian labour market.

The Government of Canada is accepting applications from organizations interested in receiving up to $800,000 in funding from the Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) per project that is up to 30 months in duration. Approximately 15 organizations will receive funding through this process. Project concepts will be accepted until April 11, 2019.

Statistics Canada releases important data on economic contribution of the nonprofit sector

March 6, 2019

Economic activity in the nonprofit sector totalled $169.2 billion in 2017, representing 8.5% of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP), according to new data relesaed by Statistics Canada. Community nonprofit institutions accounted for 16.4% of the overall sector, while business nonprofit institutions accounted for 10.4%. The most significant portion of non-profit activity (73.2%) came from government nonprofit institutions, such as hospitals and universities. If included, volunteer activities—which are important for the nonprofit sector but not included in standard macroeconomic measures—would have added a further $41.8 billion to the economy in 2013 (the most recent year of available data), representing 22.3% of nonprofit GDP that year. Imagine Canada has also released summary data, which can be read here.

Calling Canada’s amazing social entrepreneurs: Applications open for the $100,000 Social EnterPrize

March 6, 2019

Created by the Trico Charitable Foundation in 2011, the biennial Social EnterPrize celebrates and advances leadership and excellence in social entrepreneurship in Canada. Social enterprises are organizations, for-profit or not-for-profit, that blend the social and the entrepreneurial by using business models/markets to solve social problems. For the 2019 edition of the Social EnterPrize, one recipient will receive:

  • $100,000 prize money;
  • A video profile; and
  • An in-depth profile in a case-study undertaken by a Canadian post-secondary institution.

The awards will be formally presented during Global Entrepreneurship Week; on November 21, 2019 in Calgary (travel & accommodations will be provided). View Videos & Case Studies of previous recipients. To begin the application process, please complete and submit the idea submission form by March 20th, 2019. Submissions that are selected to move forward in the awards process will be contacted by May 6th, 2019 and will be given access to the full application with 4 weeks to complete it.

Five tips to optimize your online donation page

March 6, 2019

Online fundraising can seem complex. You’ve got so many different tools to figure out. All that data you can get and track. Rules, regulations, and ‘best practices’ are often changing. A lot of different people have different ideas on how you can do online fundraising. And, for many of you reading this, online is just one part of what you do, not all that you do.

To help shed some light on this subject as it relates to Canadian charities, last year I signed up to get email updates from 152 Canadian charities and then made $25 donations to all of them. I captured and scored each area — email signup, fundraising emails, and online giving experience — to produce The Canadian Online Fundraising Scorecard.

The study is free and in it you’ll find all the stats and key findings but today I want to focus on a simple framework to help with how to think about online fundraising and then provide some ideas to improve your online giving experience based on the research study and some real examples from the world’s largest online fundraising experiment library.

Three strategies to grow online fundraising

When it comes to growing your online fundraising, everything you do should really fit under one of these three main strategies:

  • Get more (quality) visitors to your website.
  • Get more of the people visiting your website to make a donation.
  • Get those making a donation to give more on average.

And the beauty of those simple strategies is that they correspond to the 3 Online Fundraising Metrics that Every Nonprofit Needs to Track:

  • Traffic
  • Conversion Rate
  • Average Gift

If you multiply those three metrics together, you get revenue. So if you increase traffic, and the other two remain the same, you’ll raise more money. And if you can increase traffic and conversion rate, with average gift staying the same, well then you’ll raise even more money.

That’s pretty straightforward — I hope — but understanding how to get started is one of the biggest questions we get asked. So much so, that we recorded a whole podcast episode to answer it, When It Comes to Online Fundraising, Where Do I Start? I’ll spoil part of the podcast and let you know that, often, one of the easiest things you can do to raise more money online is to optimize and improve your donation page so more of your current visitors — as many or as few as you get — are more likely to donate.

So with that here are...

Five tips to optimize and improve your online donation page

1. Be clear with what their donation will do.

Clarity trumps persuasion. It’s one of my favourite sayings around the office because experience shows it to be true but being clear is something every organization has the capacity and ability to do. It may be hard to be creative, or unique, or have some amazing offer but everyone can be clear. And being clear in terms what someone’s gift will do on your donation page can make a world of difference.

Because why should you give if you end up here:

Unless you’ve 100% made up your mind that you’re going to give your money away, that page could stop you in your tracks (and you may never come back).

But look at this simple experiment where the addition of a few short paragraphs of copy/text helped communicate what a donation would do and increased donations 150%:

In the research study, we saw that 64% of organizations used more than one sentence of copy to share their ‘why’ but if we would’ve looked at how many used more than 3 sentences, that number would drop to 30% or so.

If you want to tell people how their donation will help — and you need to — you have to tell them. Be clear. Be simple. Use copy.

2. Give people a reason to make a monthly donation.

Monthly giving is hugely important to long term success in fundraising but if you only look at the online giving experience you would never guess that to be true. Only 10% of organizations gave us a reason to make a recurring donation (as opposed to a one-time donation). The rest just had something like this:

Does that seem like something incredibly valuable to the organization? Or being positioned in a way where it looks like a valuable way to give for the donor? Not really...

And this isn’t unique to Canadian organizations. We also did a study on recurring giving last year with 115 nonprofits in the United States and found pretty much the same thing where just 9% of organizations had a ‘why’ or value proposition for recurring giving on their main donation page.

We saw some neat recurring giving focused ideas in the study like a pop-up at the time of one-time donation, impact calculator, and special donation anchors, but even doing something more subtle and simple like this can help:

You can see that they first answer why a donation is needed and what it will do before communicating just how valuable a recurring donation is.

If it’s important to you, you need to prioritize it but make sure you communicate the value of it not through your eyes but through theirs. Is it more impactful? More convenient? Do they get any special treatment? Then tell them.

In this example, words like ‘vital funds’ show the importance of the donation, ‘automatically’ gets at convenience, and ‘change or stop’ is empowering to a donor so they don’t fear signing up and never being able to stop.

3. Eliminate unnecessary, distracting, and conflicting links.

One of the easiest ways to optimize your donation page is to do this:

  1. Take your donation page/form out of your website template to get rid of side, top, and footer navigation
  2. Remove all the additional ways and options of giving other than online
  3. Take away any other calls to action and links that don’t help the donor complete the donation process

All those extra and unnecessary links create friction for the donor and when the different types of friction — more on the 7 types of friction here — become too much, people will abandon their donation.

They clearly have some interest in giving otherwise they wouldn’t have clicked something to get to your donation page, so confirm your message and then get out of their way. You don’t want them to sign up for your newsletter or connect with you on social media at this stage, so why have those links and options even available?

Here is a very extreme version of all the friction a donation page can create for a donor:

Look at all the distractions and decisions they are making the donor — me in this case — make. It’s so overwhelming I’d just give up if I wasn’t doing it for this study. If the visitor wasn’t actually looking to make a donation for some reason then they can use the back button or dig a bit for a link to take them away. They don’t need to see all the other things you do or things they can do so just remove them.

4. Build trust where, and when, you need it in the giving process.

It’s an unfortunate reality but many donors, especially high value older donors, are concerned about the trustworthiness of the organization and the security of their information. So why not make it easier for them to trust you and feel that their information is safe.

Add your charitable registration number, privacy policy, and even third party ‘evidentials’ — testimonials, seals, etc. — that let people see why they should trust you more. And when it comes to security, adding a little ‘lock box’ and shading the Credit Card area — where people are most information sensitive — are small things that can be a pretty big difference. Like a 14% increase in donations in this case:

Those are a few things you can do pretty easily to help put your donors at ease (and help you get more donations) but not all organizations are doing that:

  • 39% did not have their charitable registration number present on the page
  • Only 31% of organizations had ‘trust’ marks
  • 33% had no privacy policy available

Remember the monthly giving example from Ducks Unlimited? Here’s what the bottom of their page looks like:

You are a trustworthy organization with good data management and security systems so show your donors that you are when and where it matters.

5. Have a really good, warm, and thankful confirmation page.

You’ve secured the donation, nice. But the work of continuing to build the relationship with the donor is just starting. And that starts with your confirmation or thank you page. Confirming that the donation was successful and thanking them is the bare minimum (something that 12% of organizations didn’t do) but the majority of organizations said something like this:

Makes you feel all warm and tingly inside doesn’t it? Compare that to something like this form UNICEF:

There are some strategic things you can do on the confirmation page like ask for more information (how did you hear about us), give them an action to take (will your employer match your gift?), or even ask them to give again to another project or as a monthly donor but it’s easy to make sure they are thanked in a meaningful, warm, human way.

So...

Those are just a few ideas and examples of how you can improve and optimize your donation page. I’ll actually be doing a full-day certification workshop on Donation and Landing Page Optimization in Vancouver on April 12th (more here) and Toronto on May 2nd (more here) where you can dive deeper into these areas (and more), learn about the different types of donation pages you need (there are three), and understand how your, or any, landing page can be improved based on real research. If you can make it, use promo code CHARITYVILLAGE to save $100. Good luck!

Brady is the Vice President of Innovation & Optimization at NextAfter — a fundraising research lab and consultancy. A charity nerd, adjunct professor, and international speaker, his thoughts have been featured in The Huffington Post, NPR, and The Chronicle of Philanthropy among others. He lives just outside Vancouver, British Columbia and is also a host of The Generosity Freakshow, a podcast discussing how we can improve, optimize, and grow generosity. You can connect with him on LinkedIn here and follow him on Twitter, @bradyjosephson.

Six steps to being an awesome treasurer

March 6, 2019

Want to learn more on this subject? We've partnered with the author for a free webinar on March 14. Click here for more information and to register.

Virtually every charity or not-for-profit organization in Canada has a treasurer. That means there are likely almost 200,000 charity and not-for-profit treasurers in Canada. Interestingly, to the best of my knowledge, there is little if any training available or provided to these valiant souls who volunteer their time and energy to look after the finances of these organizations.

So, if you are one of these people, how can you ensure that you’re doing a good job and being an awesome treasurer? Well, first of all, there is a free, one-hour CharityVillage webinar on March 14, 2019. The remainder of this article will touch on a few of the topics that will be covered in the webinar.

Step #1: Figure out the member’s and the board’s expectations of your role in the organization.

The treasurer role varies significantly between organizations. In very small organization, the treasurer may look after everything financial (do the bookkeeping, make bank deposits, write cheques, prepare financial reports and statements, etc.). In larger organizations, the treasurer usually takes on a more strategic role – engaging the board in strategic financial discussions, evaluating the organization’s funding model, developing the board’s financial literacy, etc. Different organizations have different needs and requirements of their treasurers. So how do you figure out exactly what your role should be?

There are multiple places to look. Start by asking if your organization has a detailed position description for the treasurer role that sets out clearly the board’s expectations for your role. In addition, if your organization has a finance and/or audit committee, they may have developed Terms of Reference for that committee, which will add more information about the Treasurer’s role – since the Treasurer is usually the committee chair for this/these committees.

Next, you should look at your bylaws. Most bylaws either lay out some high-level responsibilities or note that the treasurer shall have such powers and duties as the board may specify.

Many bylaws have some version of the following basic responsibilities: The treasurer is usually responsible for doing, or making the necessary arrangements for, the following:

  • Preparing an annual financial budget
    • revenue and expense budget
    • cash flow projections
  • Managing the organization’s financial transactions
    • receiving and banking monies collected
    • paying the organization’s employees and vendors
  • Keeping accounting records in respect of the organization’s financial transactions
    • bookkeeping and accounting
    • maintaining adequate financial books and records
  • Preparing the organization’s financial statements and reports
    • for internal purposes (management, board meetings, etc.)
    • for external stakeholders (members, funders, etc.)
  • Making the organization’s filing with respect to taxes
    • income taxes, sales taxes, payroll taxes, etc.
    • Employment standards, Workers Compensation insurance

The problem with the descriptions in the bylaws, is that they are usually so high-level and so generic, that they really don’t provide much specific guidance about the detailed roles that are relevant for your organization in its sector and at this stage of its development. So, if your organization doesn’t have a good detailed position description, one of your first jobs would be to develop one and get the board to approve it. This will ensure that everyone is on the same page with respect to what your specific role is in that organization at this time. This is Step #1 in becoming an awesome treasurer.

In the upcoming webinar, we’ll recommend additional roles that awesome treasurers perform. Tune in on Thursday, March 14th to get the additional roles.

Step #2: Learn and understand what it takes for your organization to stay in financial compliance with regulatory agencies, including the Canada Revenue Agency.

Depending on the kind of work your organization does, there may be many regulatory agencies that you have to comply with. The two main ones that all organizations must comply with are the legislation under which they were incorporated and the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) rules and regulations. In addition, if you have employees, you are also required to comply with employment standards and workers compensation rules. There can also be provincial regulations with respect to fundraising or investments.

Most charities and not-for-profit organizations are incorporated under provincial legislation, but some organizations (about 10%) are incorporated under federal legislation. The financial rules of your incorporation legislation can vary significantly between jurisdictions and often imposes rules around some or all of the following issues:

  • Payments to directors (if and when you can make payments to directors)
  • Whether you can budget for and earn a profit or have a deficit
  • Whether you are required to have your annual financial statements audited by an external accountant
  • Annual report filing requirements
  • Record keeping requirements

Make sure you read the legislation under which your organization was incorporated. The CRA has multiple sets of requirements that effect all charities and not-for-profit organizations.

  • Annual information return filing requirements
    • Charities
      • T3010 Registered Charity Information Return (required)
    • Not-for-profit Organizations
      • T2 Corporation Income Tax Return (required)
      • T1044 Non-Profit Organization (NPO) Information Return (may be required)
      • T3 Trust Income Tax and Information Return (may be required)
  • Payroll returns and remittances
  • Sales tax returns and payments (there may also be non-CRA provincial sales tax requirements)
  • Record keeping requirements

In addition, the CRA has specific rules around operating either a registered charity or a not-for-profit organization.

Registered Charity Restrictions Registered Charity Restrictions
1. Organized exclusively for charitable purpose 1. Can’t be organized with a profit purpose
2. Operated exclusively for charitable purposes 2. Can’t be operated with a profit purpose
3. No part of income can be paid to or available for the personal benefit of any proprietor or member 3. No part of income can be paid to or available for the personal benefit of any proprietor or member

4. Prohibited activities:

  • Partisan political activities
  • Unrelated business activities
  • Gifts to other than qualified donees

4. Prohibited activities:

  • Operating with a profit purpose
  • Issuing donation receipts for income tax purposes
  • Receiving gifts from foundations

5. Restricted activities:

  • Public policy dialogue and development
  • Accumulating property
  • Related business activities
  • Social and fundraising activities
  • Operating through intermediaries
  • Issuing donation receipts for income tax purposes
  • Private foundations

5. Restricted activities:

  • Accumulating surpluses

Many of these issues are complex and nuanced. Spend whatever time you need to in order to understand the rules and ensure your organization stays in compliance with them. It is interesting to note that not many treasurers do this, making it a great way to distinguish yourself as an awesome treasurer.

Step #3 – Help the board think strategically about the financial viability and sustainability of the organization.

Help the board think strategically about its finances by asking some or all of the following questions:

  • Does your organization have the right funding model?
  • Are the funding activities that you are undertaking the most efficient and the most effective?
  • Are you tracking the right financial key performance indicators with respect to the organization’s financial health, financial performance and financial sustainability?
  • Do your revenue streams have enough diversification to protect your organization?
  • Do you have appropriate financial reserves in place in case something goes wrong?

Adding time on board meeting agendas to have robust conversations on topics like these is a great way to ensure you’re helping the board think strategically and to become an awesome treasurer.

Step #4 – Help the board think about financial risk and what can be done to reduce financial risk.

Consider asking your board members some or all of the following questions:

  • What are the primary financial risks that your organization faces and how might you reduce those risks?
  • Does your organization have appropriate financial systems in place for:
    • Managing financial transactions
    • Bookkeeping and accounting
    • Budgeting and financial reporting
    • Financial governance (financial policies and procedures, internal controls)
  • Does your organization have appropriately skilled financial people in place at all levels of the organization (Board, Treasurer, Finance Committee, CEO, CFO, Controller, Bookkeeper)?
  • Do you have appropriate financial internal controls in place – to protect the assets and reputations of the organization and its directors?
  • Do you take financial skills into account when you are succession planning for all positions?

Helping your board identify primary financial risks and what the organization can do to reduce those risks will set you apart as an awesome treasurer.

Step #5 – Bring in help if you need it.

Consider finding a mentor – someone from a similar organization who has more experience that would be willing to help you out. Also consider engaging accounting articling students to do some of the basic bookkeeping. It looks great on a resume for them and it adds segregation of duties and a level of independent review for you. Everybody wins.

Finally, if you start to feel uncomfortable with the potential financial risk, see if you can hire a part-time controller or Chief Financial Officer (CFO) to help with some of the higher level tasks.

Step #6 – Help find and train your successor and be available to answer questions.

For most volunteer positions in charities and not-for-profit organizations, succession planning for your position should be a first priority. Finding someone with the appropriate skills to replace yourself when you leave/retire is extremely helpful for the organization. In fact, there would be far less stress and anxiety if all volunteers agreed to help find and train their own replacement. After all your great work, you want to be sure that you set you organization up for future success, so be kind to your organization. Helping to find and train your successor will help ensure you are remembered as having been an awesome treasurer.

There you go. Hopefully some of the thoughts and ideas in the sections above will be helpful in helping you become an even more awesome treasurer!

Gordon Holley is the President and CEO of Humanity Financial Management Inc. As a CPA, CA, Gordon loves helping individuals and organizations that are trying to make the world a better place. He has over 40 years of experience on charity and not-for-profit boards, mostly as treasurer. In his role at Humanity Financial, Gordon sees the stress and anxiety produced by finances and financial reporting for many not-for-profit-organizations (NFPOs), charity board members, and senior staff. He excels at providing financial oversight to small to mid-size NFPOs and charities to help them better manage their internal finances and financial budgeting and reporting.

Canadian women will control almost $4 trillion by 2028: CIBC

March 5, 2019

Women are controlling a rising amount of wealth giving them increasing influence and control over the Canadian economy, finds a new report from CIBC Capital Markets, noting that this trend is going to continue. The Changing Landscape of Women's Wealth notes that since the 2008 recession, more women aged 25+ are working and actively participating in the economy. In fact, women in this demographic have accounted for 52% of job growth in full-time positions since 2008 and have increasingly landed jobs in higher-paying fields, with almost one-third of women in those roles now. In addition, women over the age of 55 have seen labour market participation rates rise by almost twice the amount of men during this cycle. With more women working and earning higher incomes, the historical structure of women's wealth has fundamentally changed and will only continue to grow. This growth in women's income is also giving women greater involvement and control over Canada's household wealth.

Tackling your to-do List: 5 ways to combat stress

March 5, 2019

Tackling your to-do List: 5 ways to combat stress - Are you swamped? The word itself—swamped—is quite unpleasant. It embodies all sorts of clichés: you’re in over your head; you’re in deep; you’re in a bad place; and you might not make it out. But unpleasantries aside, why do you feel so swamped? We’re willing to bet it’s because you have too much to do—more than you can even possibly get done. And yet, important people and important things are relying on your herculean efforts to somehow manage the impossible.

Plan International Canada research shows gap in gender equality when girls transition to womanhood

March 5, 2019

Plan International Canada today released new data revealing that perceptions of gender inequality reach a tipping point in the critical time of a girl's life when she enters womanhood. Between the ages of 18-24, young women in Canada report feeling less equal because of their gender and that their confidence reaches a low – and those sentiments only improve marginally over a woman's adult life. Only six out of 10 Canadian girls aged 14-17 (66%) feel as equal to their male counterparts according to a survey conducted in September 2018, and new data reveals that feeling of inequality becomes more pronounced when a girl turns 18. In a survey conducted in February 2019, less than half of Canadian young women aged 18-24 (44%) say they feel as equal – and nearly the same amount (42%) said they feel less than equal. Only 57% of women over the age of 25+ report feeling as equal, while 31% said they feel less equal. Some respondents reported feeling unsure. For more highlights from the report, click here.

Three daily actions that set the tone for workplace culture

March 5, 2019

Three daily actions that set the tone for workplace culture - Managers are central to a culture of engagement. They determine at least 70% of the variance in employee engagement. But the importance of managers specifically doesn't negate leaders' pivotal role in cultivating a culture of engagement.

The invisible professions of philanthropy

March 5, 2019

The invisible professions of philanthropy - After the development of institutional philanthropy at the end of the 19th century, different professions were called upon in the creation of this domain of action. In general, professional education and disciplinary fields accompany the emergence of new jobs or professions. This was the case for example, for social work with the training of social workers and the implementation of university programs, professional associations and journals.

Take the time to celebrate the good moments

March 5, 2019

Take the time to celebrate the good moments - You’ve worked on a report for three weeks. You think it’s one of your best pieces of work since joining this new team and manager. You’ve pushed yourself and are expecting your new boss to be over the moon with the report you prepared for her. You send the report to her and the team the night before for their review.

The Small Nonprofit Podcast: Personal development in a changing workplace with Hala Beisha

March 4, 2019

There are so many trends impacting the working world as we know it. Hala Beisha, principal and founder of Resilience Factor and certified Leadership and Executive Coach accredited by the International Coach Federation, reveals findings from her study that can help prepare you and your team to become more agile in the workplace and to grow and adapt to the changing work environment.

The “certainty of uncertainty”

The one thing that is certain in today’s world is that everything changes. There is a constant promise of uncertainty. This requires us and our teams to be agile and flexible to meet those changes. The skill set of the future (well, of today) is not technical knowledge, is adaptability.

When we are in a particular job, we learn skills and knowledge specific to that job until we switch jobs and add new skills and knowledge. This cycle of learning becomes more than just work experience, it becomes part of our identity and helps us bring value and purpose to an organization.

Hala introduces the “certainty of uncertainty” which is your ability to find ways to continue to learn. This is what sets people up for long-term success and resiliency. If you want to remain relevant, or you want your staff to remain engaged, finding opportunities to grow and develop is essential.

Where do I start?

You don’t need to necessarily start with a plan, but instead, start with a thought: what are you curious about? That way you’re putting what interests you before what you feel you should or are required to learn. Of course, if there is something specific you need to improve on, that’s a great starting point, but this is as much about learning new things as it is a commitment to ongoing learning or evolution.

Once you’ve built a bit of a foundation, now you can add on more layers of knowledge and can start developing your resiliency by seeking additional resources or opportunities.

Learn and unlearn

Learning isn’t just for your staff members, it’s for the organization as a whole through its structures and processes. Asking for feedback and consultation from staff members is crucial to both learning and unlearning to improve your organization. Only then can you present them with resources and opportunities to grow in both a professional and personal way. A mentorship is a great option for your organization to access knowledge about things they are curious about in a guided and specific way.

Another great way is to work with a professional coach. You may think that professional coaching is a form of consulting or mentorship but it’s not! It’s a relationship co-created between someone certified by the International Coach Federation (ICF) and your organization. A coach can offer services to help you discover where you are, what you’re good at, what are your blind spots and how to acknowledge and address them. Once you have good structures and processes in place, you free yourself up to become more agile, nimble and adaptable.

If you’re in the nonprofit sector, coaching can be a barrier. The ICF Toronto chapter runs a program called Coach Connect and another program called Ignite where pro-bono is offered for a period of time for those working in this sector.

When people are able to have space where people can unpack issues, better understand them, figure out where they stand and where they want to go, they are much better able to see the bigger picture and tap into different kinds of solutions.

Listen to the full episode now on our Small Nonprofit Podcast landing page!

Subscribe & Review in iTunes

Are you subscribed to the podcast? If you’re not, we want to encourage you to do that today. We have even more great interviews coming and we don’t want you to miss an episode. Click here to subscribe in iTunes!

Now if you’re feeling extra inspired, we would be really grateful if you left us a review over on iTunes, too. Those reviews help other people find our podcast. Just open the podcast in iTunes, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let us know what your favorite part of the podcast is. Thank you!

Also listen at:

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Resources from this Episode

The Good Partnership Guide
CharityVillage Career Management Articles
Resilience Factor
International Coach Federation - Coach Connect and Ignite
Hala's Twitter
Hala's LinkedIn
Barb Rosen Schreiber's LinkedIn

Listen to more episodes of the Small Nonprofit Podcast

You are going to change the world. We can help. Running a small nonprofit is not for the faint of heart. With limited resources and fueled by a combination of caffeine and passion, small charity leaders are unsung heroes. The Small Nonprofit podcast, by CharityVillage and The Good Partnership, gives you down-to-earth, practical and actionable expert guidance on how to run a small nonprofit. From leadership and law to fundraising and finance, we’ve got you covered. Forget comparing your organization to the big shops, we’re creating a community of nonprofit leaders who are going to change the world, one small nonprofit at a time. Click here for more episodes!

Your Hosts

Cindy Wagman spent 15 years as an in-house fundraiser at organizations large and small before founding The Good Partnership – a boutique fundraising firm focused on small nonprofits. She has worked in social justice, health, arts, and education organizations. She has overseen and executed everything from annual campaigns to multi-million dollar gifts. She became a Certified Fundraising Executive in 2009 and received her MBA from Rotman at the University of Toronto in 2013.

With more than ten years of experience in development, staff and stakeholder management, strategic thinking, partnerships, board governance, and program development, Aine McGlynn is a diversely talented, self-starter committed to finding creative solutions in unexpected places. Aine holds a PhD from U of T and has a history of academic publishing, along with her decade of nonprofit sector experience. She is a practitioner-scholar focused on how to help nonprofits build their capacity to be successful at fundraising.

Canada Post Community Foundation for Children accepting grant applications for 2019

March 4, 2019

The Canada Post Community Foundation for Children is accepting applications for 2019 grants. More than $1.15 million is available for charities, school programs and groups that serve the needs of young people. Applications are available until April 5, and are open to national and grassroots local organizations across the country.

The Small Nonprofit Podcast: Government relations 101 with Chris Holz

March 1, 2019

In this episode of The Small Nonprofit, Chris Holz, seasoned public affairs executive and one of the top 10 lobbyists at Queen’s Park, teaches us about the foundations of government relations, how to build it into your practice and how to develop your relationship with different levels of government BEFORE a crisis happens.

Where does your money come from?

Chris recommends starting with finding out where your funding sources come from and focus there. In addition to the specific department, ministry or agency, also look at your local representatives. Once you identify them, you want to get to know them better and build a relationship. It’s so important for you to understand their specific platforms, which you can find during their election campaign platform pages, annual budget speeches and exercises or speeches from the minister of your particular area or department.

Your organization + government officials = partners

Most people working in government agencies want to see you be successful and you can help them by getting to know them and their priorities. Both public servants and political staffers can be your allies, if you take the time to build that relationship.

How to become a priority

You can start by having a sense of where things are going. This means paying attention to how policies are evolving and the intentions of the government in order to understand their needs and translating what you do to fit their needs. It’s asking yourself, “how does my work fit into the broader issues that the government is tackling?” and “what has my organization accomplished with regards to these issues?”

By understanding the government’s priorities with policy, you can frame and articulate the work you’re doing in a way where the public servants can understand and be your champion. In this sense, you’re helping them meet their goals and at the same time, you’re gaining a pulse on what’s coming down the pipeline in terms of policy, political agenda and understanding what your audience wants to know.

From this point, you can invite them to events such as an AGM, where you can share your organization’s success and how it fits with what they care about. You should also think about other strategies such as media relations where you can build your organization’s online presence and share success stories there.

What is a crisis and how to avoid it

A crisis can be everything from threats of funding cuts, to being on the front-page news in a major newspaper. Chris advises us to understand where the government is coming from, what their purpose is, whether or not it’s a fiscal issue and what they’re supposed to do in other areas. You need to understand what is realistic and possible for the government to do, otherwise, any efforts can get shut down really quickly.

Only once you understand this information, you can start to build a case for your organization and why you or like-minded groups like you should be treated differently. You can do this by mobilizing communities, such as clients or family members of clients, especially if it's a social service agency. You can also consider doing media time at an appropriate point to start to build a public case for why the government should or should not do something to sway public opinion.

There are a lot of small organizations that have a huge impact and great strength because political decision-makers and public servants are champions of these organizations. It's not about size, but thinking about what’s at stake, which in some cases it can be everything. We need to be mindful of public servants, what they can realistically do and what resources they can share with you. It’s about sharing why our organizations are so valuable and worth funding.

Listen to the full episode now on our Small Nonprofit Podcast landing page!

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Resources from this Episode

The Good Partnership Guide
CharityVillage Advocacy Articles
Campbell Strategies
Globe and Mail Series
International Coach Federation

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Your Hosts

Cindy Wagman spent 15 years as an in-house fundraiser at organizations large and small before founding The Good Partnership – a boutique fundraising firm focused on small nonprofits. She has worked in social justice, health, arts, and education organizations. She has overseen and executed everything from annual campaigns to multi-million dollar gifts. She became a Certified Fundraising Executive in 2009 and received her MBA from Rotman at the University of Toronto in 2013.

With more than ten years of experience in development, staff and stakeholder management, strategic thinking, partnerships, board governance, and program development, Aine McGlynn is a diversely talented, self-starter committed to finding creative solutions in unexpected places. Aine holds a PhD from U of T and has a history of academic publishing, along with her decade of nonprofit sector experience. She is a practitioner-scholar focused on how to help nonprofits build their capacity to be successful at fundraising.

Vote for CharityVillage in the 2019 HR Reporter Readers’ Choice Awards

February 28, 2019

We hope you'll consider voting for CharityVillage as your preferred Job Board and Specialized Recruitment Agency in the HR Reporter Readers' Choice Awards! We are so proud and honoured to have been the Canadian nonprofit sector’s largest and most trusted online resource for recruiting, news and how-to information, for more than 20 years. If you'd like to help us win the Job Board and Specialized Recruitment Category, as well as vote for some of your other favourite companies and websites (including our partner company TalentEgg!), please take the survey by March 18. Click here to vote!

Veterans Affairs Canada now accepting 2019 applications for the Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund

February 28, 2019

The Veteran and Well-being Fund supports innovative initiatives and projects through grants and contributions to private, public or academic organizations to conduct research and implement initiatives and projects that support the well-being of Veterans and their families. Today, Veterans Affairs Canada launched the second call for applications for the Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund. Organizations are invited to share their innovative ideas and encouraged to submit their applications online as early as possible. The deadline to submit an application for the 2019 year is March 29, 2019. Learn more about the Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund at veterans.gc.ca/VFWB.

Register now for Blumbergs Charity Law Boot Camp and International Philanthropy Conference

February 28, 2019

Blumbergs is pleased to announce that we will be hosting Blumbergs' Canadian Charity Law Boot Camp again on Monday April 8, 2019. This is a one-day boot camp on compliance and standards issues for Canadian registered charities. You can register for the program here. This one-day workshop on Monday April 8, 2019 will cover the differences between for-profits, non-profits and registered charities and why in some cases you may wish to have one or more of each to have maximum impact. It will focus on matters that are significant for any operating charity surrounding revenue generation rules, receipting, transparency, and protecting your charity against risks. Topical issues such as collaboration, foreign activities, political activities, the Canada Not-for-Profit Corporations Act (CNCA) and Ontario Non-Profit Corporations Act (ONCA) will be touched upon as well.

Blumbergs is also holding a full-day event on international philanthropy on April 12, 2019: Blumbergs' International Philanthropy Conference 2019. There are significant risks and compliance issues when Canadian charities conduct foreign activities or foreign donors wish to donate to Canadian charities. Blumbergs’ International Philanthropy Conference 2019 is a full day of presentations and discussions from various charity law and compliance experts that will include 3 parts: Fundamentals of Foreign Activities, CRA audits and foreign activity charities, and Challenges and Recent Changes to Non-Profit Law and Regulation in Asia. Get more information and register here.

Joule Innovation grants to deliver $200,000 in support of Canadian ingenuity in health care

February 28, 2019

The 4th annual Joule Innovation grant program is underway and, more than ever, aims to drive change in the health care system. This year, selected recipients will share $200,000 in grants for initiatives designed to help shape a better health care future for all Canadians. Since 2016, the grant program has provided $500,000 to 19 recipients, powering physician-led innovation in the country. The Joule Innovation grant program opens today and will accept applications until March 28, 2019 (11:59 PM EST). This year's categories are as follows:

  • Access to care (2 grants: $100,000 & $20,000). These grants support CMA member-led initiatives that focus on innovative solutions to improve access to health care for all Canadians. This year there is a special emphasis on projects that focus on marginalized communities who face challenges in obtaining equitable access to health care services and rural and remote populations who often find themselves underserved for all or part of the year.
  • Health care solution (2 grants: $40,000 & $20,000). Each day, physicians, governments and policy-makers struggle to manage the limited resources available for our health care system. Health care solution grants will support initiatives aimed at enhancing the quality, safety and efficiency of health care and improving health outcomes for patients, while at the same time reducing overall costs within the Canadian health care system.
  • Emerging physician innovator (4 x $5,000) - Student grants (2x $5,000) - Resident grants (2 x $5000). Grants for medical students and residents representing the future of medicine in Canada. These grants will help support the ideas of medical learners and residents who are looking to increase or improve access to care or create health care solutions that will provide better outcomes for patients.

In addition to valuable, flexible funding, recipients will also benefit from Joule Innovation Council mentorship and access to a network of innovation leaders. To learn more about the application process or to submit an idea, visit www.joulecma.ca/innovate/grants.

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