Newsbytes

New report to detail Canada’s largest point of sale fundraising

September 2, 2015

Companies & Causes Canada has started gathering data on point of sale fundraising campaigns (those that raised over $500,000 in 2014) for a first-of-its-kind report called “Canada’s Charity Checkout Champions”. The report will serve both as a benchmarking tool for companies and causes that ask consumers to contribute at the till as well as a best practices guide for practitioners. If your nonprofit organization raised over $500,000 in 2014 from consumers with corporate partners, you are eligible for inclusion in this important report. Fill out this online survey to be considered or email ms@companiesandcausescanada.com for more information.

Atkinson Decent Work Fund now accepting letters of interest from Ontario programs

September 1, 2015

The Atkinson Decent Work Fund, a funding program of the Atkinson Foundation, promotes social and economic justice in Ontario. It’s a grants program aimed at creating work, wealth and wellbeing for people and communities cut off from the well-traveled routes to prosperity. It’s about removing roadblocks, building bridges and taking detours to get to an economy that works for the 100% and the planet too. A webinar was hosted for prospective applicants in August. If there is sufficient interest, there will be a second one on Wednesday, September 9, 2015 at 10:00 am. Please contact Atkinson’s Administrative Coordinator Phillip Roh at info@atkinsonfoundation.ca if you are interested in attending the second session. The foundation invites you send a letter of inquiry for funding no later than Monday, September 14, 2015 at 5:00 pm.

Lawson Foundation announces new micro-grant funding opportunity for youth programs

September 1, 2015

The Lawson Foundation is excited to announce a new micro-grant funding opportunity - 5G Fund: Accelerate. The Foundation is inviting letters of intent from registered charities (and other qualified donees as per CRA) across Canada that support innovative educational initiatives focused on youth mental health. Successful proposals:

  • Must be youth-led, actively support the leadership of young Canadians, or have a positive impact on youth.
  • Must take place within Canada.
  • Should be innovative and creative and have a positive impact in a community.

Please check the Foundation's website for funding criteria, timelines and the link to submit an online application. Note that the submission deadline is Wednesday September 30th, 2015 at 1:00 pm EDT.

US report identifies challenges in getting donors to change their giving habits

September 1, 2015

The Camber Collective has released the new Money for Good 2015 report, which examines giving patterns in US households with incomes of $80K and up. Key findings from the report include:

  • Donors feel overwhelmed by the giving process, are often uncertain where to start, don’t have the information they want, feel pressed for time, and hence default to comfortable but less effective giving habits.
  • Donors don't know how much they give compared to their peers: 75% of Americans think they donate more than average. In reality, 72% contribute at a rate below the national average.
  • Donors want clearer communication with nonprofits: 49% don’t know how nonprofits are using their money, 34% feel hassled and 20% are unsure who benefits from the work they’re funding.
  • Nonprofit name recognition trumps impact: 61% prefer to give to well-known nonprofits but not necessarily the most effective organizations.
  • Donors are reluctant to change their giving patterns: 67% are loyal to their primary causes, only 13% intend to give to different nonprofits oand nly 9% compare nonprofits before giving.

Toronto youth organizations encouraged to apply to The Little Give

August 27, 2015

Each year, Edelman Canada employees in Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and Montreal roll up their sleeves and take on The Little Give/Le Petit Geste for not-for-profit organizations in their communities. This year, Toronto’s Little Give will take place over three days from October 1 at 3pm to October 3 at 4pm. Inspired by Oprah’s Big Give, The Little Give is a volunteering program that taps into Edelman employees’ diverse skill sets and passion...as well as a whole lot of elbow grease...to make a difference in the communities around them. Staff dedicate 48 hours to work with incredible charity partners. Charities will be selected based on their diverse range of offerings and need. Organizations that meet the following criteria will be eligible for consideration:

  • Registered non-profit organization
  • Based in Toronto
  • Organization’s core work revolves around youth
  • Have at least one staff member available as a contact person from Thursday, October 1 at 3pm to Saturday, October 3 at 4pm (this does not need to be the same person for all three days).
  • Have a need or opportunity for Edelman employees to participate in a physical task

Please fill out this form to apply for the Little Give by September 9, 2015. Submit by email: jill.delarzac@edelman.com.

Calgary Foundation now accepting applications for Fall 2015

August 26, 2015

The Calgary Foundation's Community Grants Program promotes a healthy, vibrant community that embraces diversity and supports all of its members. The average size Community Grant over the past few years has been approximately $30,000 - although some are larger and some are smaller. Contact Grants staff to explore larger amounts that might be available for collaborative projects, or to inquire about smaller amounts for organizational development. The Fall 2015 Grant Request Template is now available and proposals must: Create New Futures; Engage Citizens; Strengthen Charities; and/or Explore and Celebrate Our History and Culture. The deadline for submissions is September 10, 2015.

Stars of Alberta Volunteer Awards accepting nominations for 2015

August 26, 2015

The Stars of Alberta Volunteer Awards recognize extraordinary Albertans whose volunteer efforts have contributed to the well-being of their community and fellow community members. Six awards, two in each category of youth, adult and senior are presented annually on or around International Volunteer Day, December 5. The 2015 nomination form is now available and the deadline for submissions is Tuesday, September 15, 2015.

Share your #UpgradeYourWorld ideas for a chance to receive funding from Microsoft

August 25, 2015

To mark the launch of Windows 10, Microsoft announced that they will help 10 global and 100 local nonprofits achieve greatness by investing more than $10 million in cash and technology. Is there a park or a community centre in your neighbourhood that needs a makeover? A local playground that needs new equipment? Do you have a friend, teacher or colleague who devotes themselves to making the world a better place? Microsoft wants to hear about it. Here's how you get involved: Tweet @WindowsCanada or comment on Windows Canada Facebook using the hashtag #UpgradeYourWorld, and tell Microsoft about the people or groups in your community who are empowering others to do great things. Or join the conversation and explain how you would upgrade your world. Over the coming months, Microsoft will bring a few of these suggestions to life. The deadline for submissions is August 31, 2015.

GivingTuesday launches new charity toolkit for 2015

August 25, 2015

Planning to participate in GivingTuesday this December? GivingTuesday Canada has launched a new toolkit to help your charity make the most of this annual giving event. The GivingTuesday Toolkit for Charities includes background details and information on why you should consider participating, five steps to a successful campaign, how to access the resources you need and answers to frequently asked questions. In 2015, GivingTuesday takes place on December 1.

Help green your city this fall with TD Tree Days

August 25, 2015

This September and October, TD Friends of the Environment Foundation (TD FEF) is inviting Canadians to roll up their sleeves and help green where they live by volunteering at TD Tree Days. According to recent research from TD FEF, protecting existing green spaces (56%) and creating new ones (51%) are priorities when it comes to urban greening initiatives. Canadians polled strongly believe that these spaces are an important legacy for children and future generations (67%), important to the health of the community (61%), and help enhance economic value of the area (51%). Now in its sixth year, TD Tree Days is a grassroots community tree planting program. As TD's flagship volunteer program – and part of TD Bank's TD Forests program – TD Tree Days provides TD employees and their families, customers and community partners the opportunity to support local environmental stewardship. In the last five years, thousands of volunteers have planted over 185,000 trees from coast to coast through TD Tree Days. To see if there is a TD Tree Days planting in your community or for more information, visit tdtreedays.com.

Toronto Foundation's 16th Vital Signs Report exposes pervasive inequity among citizens

Released today, Toronto Foundation's 16th Toronto's Vital Signs Report reveals the extent to which inequity infiltrates all aspects of life in the city. For the first time in its history, the report uses an equity lens to disaggregate data and paints a clear picture that quality of life in Toronto varies drastically depending on neighbourhood, income, race, immigration status, gender, sexual identity, and age. The report also gives Torontonians concrete, actionable steps to be part of ending inequity in the city. Some general facts highlighted in the report:

  • The middle income range is between $24,000 and $42,000. This is the middle class in Toronto. This group saw income gains of just 6% over ten years while the top fifth of earners experienced a 9% increase.
  • The number of residents living on low income has grown to 20% of the population, and the average real employment increase for this cohort was 6% from 2005-2015, while the top fifth of all earners saw an increase of 9%.
  • For the first time, there are more seniors than children in Toronto and the most common household type (replacing couples with children) is people living alone.
  • For the first time, more than half identify as belonging to a visible minority.
  • Toronto is a thriving global centre. The population has grown to more than 2.7 million (up 4.5% between 2001 and 2016).

The 2017/18 Toronto's Vital Signs report concludes with a bold call to action (page 75) to use the report to spark dialogue, inform upcoming voting decisions and disrupt charitable giving patterns. The full report can be read here.

Toronto Foundation's 16th Vital Signs Report exposes pervasive inequity among citizens

Released today, Toronto Foundation's 16th Toronto's Vital Signs Report reveals the extent to which inequity infiltrates all aspects of life in the city. For the first time in its history, the report uses an equity lens to disaggregate data and paints a clear picture that quality of life in Toronto varies drastically depending on neighbourhood, income, race, immigration status, gender, sexual identity, and age. The report also gives Torontonians concrete, actionable steps to be part of ending inequity in the city. Some general facts highlighted in the report:

  • The middle income range is between $24,000 and $42,000. This is the middle class in Toronto. This group saw income gains of just 6% over ten years while the top fifth of earners experienced a 9% increase.
  • The number of residents living on low income has grown to 20% of the population, and the average real employment increase for this cohort was 6% from 2005-2015, while the top fifth of all earners saw an increase of 9%.
  • For the first time, there are more seniors than children in Toronto and the most common household type (replacing couples with children) is people living alone.
  • For the first time, more than half identify as belonging to a visible minority.
  • Toronto is a thriving global centre. The population has grown to more than 2.7 million (up 4.5% between 2001 and 2016).

The 2017/18 Toronto's Vital Signs report concludes with a bold call to action (page 75) to use the report to spark dialogue, inform upcoming voting decisions and disrupt charitable giving patterns. The full report can be read here.

First known study examining how retirement affects charitable giving finds men and women give differently

A new report from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute is the first known scholarly research examining how retirement affects charitable giving. The study finds that while most households decrease their overall spending around retirement, they generally maintain charitable giving levels — but gender differences exist. Single women and married couples are more likely to give, give more and give more consistently than single men in the years surrounding retirement. Single women and married couples are also more likely than single men to volunteer at this time in their lives. Key findings from the report include:

  • Both men and women maintain their charitable giving after retirement, especially compared to other types of spending, which typically decrease at this stage in life.
  • Around retirement, single women and married couples are more likely to give and give more than single men. These gender differences are consistent with patterns seen both before and after retirement.
  • Around retirement, giving by single women and married couples is more stable than giving by single men. Single men’s likelihood of giving and amount of giving varies widely from year to year, compared to single women and married couples.
  • Around retirement, single women and married couples are more likely to volunteer, and their likelihood of volunteering is more constant over time, compared to single men.

Solve your organization’s research challenges with expertise from SFU’s Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences

The collaboration between SFU FASS and Mitacs facilitates and funds research relationships between SFU graduate students and community partners in the nonprofit and corporate sectors. Mitacs is a national, not-for-profit organization that has designed and delivered research and training programs in Canada since 1999. Working with 60 universities, thousands of partner organizations, and both federal and provincial governments, Mitacs builds partnerships that support industrial and social innovation in Canada. Funding through Accelerate – Mitacs’ flagship program – starts at $15,000 for four months and can scale up from there. Accelerate applications are open to participants in all disciplines and sectors, and are accepted at any time. SFU’s Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences features 315 faculty members and over 700 graduate students, conducting cutting-edge, community-relevant research in 16 departments, 10 programs, and a language institute.

One-on-one support for finding the person to provide the skills and research you need is available from Drs. Allison Brennan, Director, Business Development at Mitacs, and Sean Zwagerman, Associate Dean, SFU Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences. Please contact sean_zwagerman@sfu.ca with your questions, opportunities, or research needs.

Government of Canada announces nomination of co-chairs to Advisory Committee on the Charitable Sector

The Honourable Diane Lebouthillier, Minister of National Revenue, announced the nomination of Hilary Pearson and Bruce MacDonald as co-chairs of the newly created permanent Advisory Committee on the Charitable Sector (ACCS). The ACCS will provide recommendations to the Minister of National Revenue and the Commissioner of the Canada Revenue Agency on important and emerging issues facing the sector. The government implemented important legislative changes to the rules governing the political activities of charities in December 2018 to respond to many of the recommendations of the Report of the Consultation Panel on the Political Activities of Charities. This announcement marks the government’s final response to this report. As stated in May 2017, this response lifts the suspension on the remaining audits and objections under the political activities program. The new rules on public policy dialogue and development activities, passed into law on December 13, 2018, will apply retroactively to the remaining audits and objections.

Bell Let's Talk supports Indigenous mental health programming at Behavioural Health Foundation

Bell Let's Talk announced a donation of $240,000 to the Behavioural Health Foundation (BHF) to support Indigenous programming as a core component of holistic residential treatment for adults and families affected by addictions and co-occurring mental health issues. Indigenous healing at BHF incorporates a wide range of culturally-relevant programs including naming and healing ceremonies, full moon and pipe ceremonies, spring, summer, fall and winter ceremonies, sweat lodges, women's sweats, grieving sweats, medicine picking, drumming, traditional teachings, sharing circles, Ghost Dance, and Sundance, as well as mentoring, traditional counselling and support for adults and families. Traditional programming offers meaningful help to those members of the community who, for many reasons, are not comfortable or well-served by mainstream therapy.

Over a quarter of Canadian men fear discussing mental health at work could risk their job

One in four Canadian men (28%) fear their job could be at risk if they discussed their mental health at work, according to new research by Movember. The study, conducted by Ipsos MORI, surveyed 1,000 Canadian men aged between 18 and 75. It found that 42% of men would be worried about colleagues making negative comments behind their backs if they discussed mental health issues at work. A further 33% of men think they could be held back from promotion at work if they mentioned a problem that they were finding it difficult to cope with. The majority of Canadian men are aware of the availability of mental health days in their workplace, with just over half (54%) of employed men said they would be able to take time off work, if they were struggling with their mental health or other personal issues. However, this research shows that stigma surrounding mental health is still preventing men from talking about their problems and seeking help when they need it.